From this to this!

One of the joys for a photographer is to see how their images are used by others.  How will they interpret your images or will they change the message you intended when you made the photograph?  One of the pleasures of working with graphic designers is getting a brief of what they want and then going out to achieve the specific requirement, armed with the knowledge of what they are tasked to achieve.  The following image and location was the subject of a recent blog came about following a brief chat with a designer and now it has been used to promote walking tours featuring CS Lewis:

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This image was interpreted in the following way.  Note how the feel of the image is now projecting a much more dramatic and even sinister mood!  The skills of the photographer and the graphic designer coming together.

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.

 

 

What is it about sunsets?

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The faintest hint of a sunset brings all sorts of people out with their camera’s to record the spectacular colours and hues of late evening sunlight.  They then wait with baited breath to see how the image has been captured.

However few people properly process the images taken, either they take no action to correct or adjust brightness or contrast or worse still they over do the adjustments to create an image that bears little resemblance to what the scene actually looked like.

The two images featured here in Foca, Turkey were taken a couple of weeks ago during an evening walk after our evening meal and here I merely want to tell you how I processed them!

Both images were processed in Adobe Lightroom 5, which I find to be a just superb, no need to use Photoshop.  Upon importing the images the first thing I do after key wording the images and completing the metadata information is to apply my camera preset to the images.  The preprepared camera presets more accurately display the image colours, provided the camera presets was properly created in the first instance.

My next step is to apply the lens correction profile, we may as well see the image as the camera saw it!  Only then do I go to the basic settings to adjust exposure, contrast highlights and shadows.

In the case of these two images I left the exposure setting along, I could have lightened the dark areas of the image, but its a sunset so its meant to be dark.  I had no over exposed areas so no adjustment to highlights was necessary.  My only significant adjustments were to the clarity adjustment which brings out the texture of the image and to the vibrance setting, but only very slightly as this tool can make the image unrealistic.  The last control was saturation and this was left untouched – believe it or not!

My intention is to create an image and to render it as I remembered the scene.  Both images taken with a Fujifilm X Pro 1 camera, 14mm lens, 200ISO, 1/60 second and a wide aperture.

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission

Sunset at Ballintoy

Spurred on by the sunset featured in my last blog I decided to make the journey to Ballintoy on the north coast.  This location is rather spectacular, especially if the light is right.  I knew from previous visits that the sun sets over the sea and a projecting headland.
 
Arriving at about 5pm the sky was overcast, nevertheless I decided to wait until sunset.   Surprisingly the overcast sky began to break up revealing the setting sun.  There is no substitute for patience in landscape photography.
 
In trying to find the optimum position to shoot from I pulled a calf muscle while climbing over rocks, which reduced my mobility.  So these images was taken from a bench at the car park, as indeed where most of my images.  Photography is not a painless process in more ways than one! 
 
Shooting straight into the sun does present it’s challenges.  I used a 0.9 hard graduated filter to try to balance the extremes of light.  The biggest problem is lens flair and it was not always possible to avoid it, we just have to live with it I think!
 
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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.

The gift of photography

Many will know that one of my photographic influencers is the Vancouver based photographer David duChemin. His recent blog speaks of the gift of photography.

Last night I received one of those gifts while driving home at sunset when I came across this isolated tree in front of a sunset. Making this image rewarded me as the image maker and I hope that it equally rewards you as the viewer.

In making the image I walked into a field from the roadside to isolate the tree as the main subject allowing the sunset to be the other element in the image. It is the photographer who decides what is in and what is out of the frame, how close to get and how far to step back and what exposure values to key in.

Pictures should tell stories or at least create moods. To a greater or lessor extent we all live in societies where politicians mess up, we need images like this to calm us down!

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.

Memories from the 40s

Below are just random photographs taken at the War Years Remembered collection in Ballyclare, Co Antrim where the largest collection in Ireland of world war one and world war two memorabilia is currently housed.

The collection is now closed to the public and its future is uncertain.  It is hoped that this collection can be preserved for future generations.

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Hopefully the collection will remain intact and have a new permanent home where it can be open to the public.   

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley.  Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.

 

Monochrome or Colour

For this short blog I have returned to Nendrum Monastic Site, the colour version of this scene has been featured before, but this time I want to compare it with a monochrome conversion.  Here are both versions:

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The monochrome was created using Silver Efex Pro and a preset selected which makes use of the full dynamic range within the image, hence the fuller detail in the sky.  The problem is that when making monochrome versions I never know which one I like the best, so perhaps you can drop me an email and let me know.  Somehow I think the monochrome has created greater depth, almost a 3D effect.

The joy of photography is that there are endless possibilities!

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley.  Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.

 

Painting with light (continued)

Following on from my last blog in which I discussed recognising light quality and how special light can produce great images.  In this short blog I am looking at the light produced by sunsets.  Here is an example that I have not published before:

Sunset from Mahee Island, Strangford Lough

Three great effects are created by the setting sun, firstly the light of the sun picks up dust in the atmosphere giving it that great golden glow.  Secondly long shadows are produced giving a sense of depth and shape to the landscape and lastly, the clouds are lit from below giving an edge to the clouds.

The final touches in this image was to produce the starburst in the setting sun, this is simply achieved by selecting a small lens aperture, in this case f20.  Secondly there is as much interest in the sky from the horizon upwards as there is in the low portion of the image, so the horizon was purposely set less that one third from the bottom of the frame.  In taking this type of shot we are looking to create some drama in the image.  I hope you agree it has succeeded.

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley.  Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.