Belfast County Down Railway

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As I get older I am very conscious of change and am saddened by the lack of interest in preserving our past.  Far too often grand old buildings are torn down with little thought or regard.
 
I often drive along the Ballyhenry Road just outside Comber Co Down where there is a visual reminder of the past; railway lines crossing the narrow road where evidence of the railway is long gone.  It deserved a photograph as the original track side building survives although now modified as a dwelling house.
 
Unfortunately I have been unable to locate an image of what it originally looked like as it would have been interesting to make the comparison. However I did find a reference to it from Comber Historical Society which reads as follows:
 
‘The third level crossing was ‘Henryville’ on the Ballyhenry Road staffed by Andy Bennett, and then in the late 1940s by Mr Patrick McIlreavy. This cottage is also still in use and much modified – in fact the very railway lines are still to be seen in the road beside it to this day. A preservation order might well be considered before a resurfacing or re-alignment plan would have them buried from view forever!’
 
It’s been well over sixty years since trains ran on this line making their way to Donaghadee via Newtownards!
 
All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission

 

 

Low light qualities of the X Pro 1

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A quick visit to Howth Pier gave me an opportunity to try out my Fujifilm X Pro 1 at night time.  The image above was taken at Howth when I photographed these fishermen landing their catch.  It was taken at 22.40 using only the available light from the fishing trawler and the lighting on the quayside.

I used a surprisingly low ISO setting, just 640, with my 35mm lens wide open at f1.4.  The 35mm Fujinon lens is a remarkable piece of glass, all the Fuji prime lenses are very fast! Shooting at 1/60 second the camera was handheld.  You cannot really judge the quality from the above photograph which is just 700pixels wide, so below I have selected a 100% crop from the above image so as you can judge for yourself.

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Even at 100% resolution the image is quite smooth with minimal digital noise, I have not used the sharpening tool in preparing these images, even the exposure and contrast settings have been left untouched.

What is there not to like about the X Pro 1?  It is providing a serious challenge to my Nikon gear; anyone what to buy a camera?

 

More photographic lines!

My blog entitled Lines in Hamilton Street discussed the forces produced by lines in the image.  Today I took this image of the Customs House in Belfast which is also characterised by directional lines, but in addition to this the open space adds further impact to the image.

There are several ways to read this image; the white converging lines in the foreground draw your eye into the building which takes centre stage.  The building itself is also sandwiched by a grey foreground and an equally grey sky providing a horizontal presentation of the building which also itself has a horizontal format and thereby producing a balance within the image.

I had to wait quite a while for parked cars to clear the front of the building and to ensure that no pedestrians were cluttering the foreground.  Patience can sometimes pay!

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.  

The image tells it’s story!

I took this viewpoint in daylight, which featured a few blogs back, and later decided that I must return at nighttime to take the image from exactly the same viewpoint as before.  This image is the result.  The Harland and Wolff cranes have become an iconic symbol associated with Belfast and can be seen in the skyline from many different parts of the city.  But what does this image convey?

In the early twentieth century Belfast was an industrial powerhouse and the shipyard was a very busy place employing thousands of workers, this continued up until the 1970s but today it is a shadow of its former glory.  Yet the shipyard still survives by diversification.  In this image we see an oil rig being refitted and there is a sense of the old spirit of the Yard being revived, at least in part.

The lighting surrounding the oil rig communicates that activity is going on around the clock and the brightness draws your eye into the image.  The derelict ground in the foreground now ripe for redevelopment shows the contrast.  In bygone days the entire site would have been a hive of activity.  This is how the image works for me – every image should tell a story.

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission