Belfast County Down Railway

Bradley-6009

As I get older I am very conscious of change and am saddened by the lack of interest in preserving our past.  Far too often grand old buildings are torn down with little thought or regard.
 
I often drive along the Ballyhenry Road just outside Comber Co Down where there is a visual reminder of the past; railway lines crossing the narrow road where evidence of the railway is long gone.  It deserved a photograph as the original track side building survives although now modified as a dwelling house.
 
Unfortunately I have been unable to locate an image of what it originally looked like as it would have been interesting to make the comparison. However I did find a reference to it from Comber Historical Society which reads as follows:
 
‘The third level crossing was ‘Henryville’ on the Ballyhenry Road staffed by Andy Bennett, and then in the late 1940s by Mr Patrick McIlreavy. This cottage is also still in use and much modified – in fact the very railway lines are still to be seen in the road beside it to this day. A preservation order might well be considered before a resurfacing or re-alignment plan would have them buried from view forever!’
 
It’s been well over sixty years since trains ran on this line making their way to Donaghadee via Newtownards!
 
All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission

 

 

Does B&W make a difference?

The image featured in this blog was also taken in Donaghadee Co Down on the same shoot as the image in my last blog.  It was an image that I had initially dismissed until I made a monochrome version.

I seldom use Lightroom presets but in this case I used a preset which produces a punchy B@W image, for comparison I will show the original and the conversion and let the reader decide which is best.

bradley-3713 bradley-3713mono

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission

 

 

 

 

What makes a strong image?

Here I just want to discuss my thinking behind an image I made this week, taken at Donaghadee Harbour in Co Down.  We have just experienced extremely stormy weather and high tides battering the coastline.  I did not venture out over this period and this image represents the calm after the storm taken on Wednesday of this week.

Donaghadee Lifeboat and Lighthouse

Donaghadee Lifeboat and Lighthouse

Taken around 3.30pm on a beautiful January day I wanted to ensure I had some strong colour to dominate the scene, I was essentially after a strong image rather than just a general scene.  Seeing the lifeboat I moved in quite close so that it filled a prominent position in the frame.  I wanted to include the lighthouse as part of the composition and so a portrait format was chosen.

I liked the vertical force coming out of the scene, notice the red handrail, the superstructure of the lifeboat and the lighthouse in ascending height from right to left!  The strong colour immediately draws your eye to that part of the image the vertical force draws your eye upwards.  Both the colour and this vertical force gives the image added strength and only after these attributes were identified did I release the shutter.

My point of focus was on the front of the lifeboat superstructure and using a f5.6 aperture I obtained sharpness throughout the image.  I wonder how it would have looked at f1.4? Should have tried this!  The important factor in making an image is to pre-visualise what you want to achieve.  

The image was taken with a Fujifilm X Pro 1 fitted with a 35mm f1.4 lens produces faithful colour and beautifully sharp images and its light weight makes it a joy to use.

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission