Saintfield’s Market House

Saintfield Market House was built in 1802 by N Price. It is a two-storey three-bay structure. The pediment above the central bay contains a clock. There is a simple square louvred cupola. The building beside the market house was an hotel which was built at the same time.  Now serving as an Orange Hall it was first used as a Courthouse in 1804. The clock in the roof of the building was made by the Saintfield clock maker, Samuel Spratt. The iron gates in the three archways date from 1828.  The two photographs show the Parish Church on one side and the hotel on the other side.

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission

 

 

Front Cover!

Taking a photograph for the front cover of a book was an enjoyable task to undertake, especially when it was in the heart of the beautiful Co Fermanagh countryside.  I learned a few things too!  Left to myself I would have taken a portrait layout for the front cover, but when the image is required to wrap around both front and back covers then obviously landscape is the appropriate format.  It is also good to know where to leave space for the text, with these parameters sussed out the final composure can be framed, as set out below:

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The old Crom Castle was the perfect spot, see The Actions of the Enniskillen Men.

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission

The Fruit Shop – Monaghan Town

I don’t often publish photographs from my older files, preferring instead to concentrate on my present day work.  However I came across an image I made back in April 2009 and wondered why I have never processed it before now!

This photography was taken in Monaghan town and to be honest I don’t remember precisely where.  Its a rather quirky fruit shop set in an unusual location, which is probably why I made the image.  If anyone can say if it’s still in business please do let me know. Anyway here it is:

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission

 

 

Rough Island

A gentle walk last night prompted me to write this short blog about Island Hill, or to be more precise about Rough Island, a small island of approximately 7 acres, which can be accessed via a causeway at low tide just outside Comber.

Rough Island, which sounds like something from Treasure Island, was inhabited up until the early part of the 1900’s. The remains of the old farm cottage and its orchard can still be seen. Farming ceased on the island completely in the 1950s and the island has reverted to  bramble and hawthorn. It is now owned and maintained by Ards Borough Council.

The causeway usually only remains submerged for around an hour at high tide but this can be affected by the weather and the time of year. The walk across the causeway and around the island takes around ¾ of an hour and provides a wonderful views of this part of Strangford Lough.

A couple of photographs taken yesterday:

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 All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.  

Gill’s Almshouses, Carrickfergus

Isn’t it surprising that having visited a place many times and yet there is always something that goes unnoticed.  In my case this was Gill’s Almshouses located in Governor’s Place just across the road from Carrickfergus Castle.

The almshouses were built with finances from the will of Henry Gill in 1842 in the Tudor style from designs by Charles Lanyon.  It was was Gill’s intention that the provision of accommodation for aged men decayed in their circumstances would be made.

They were certainly preferable to the workhouse.

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission 

Hungering after film photography

The last time I ran a role of film through a film camera was around 2002 and in recent months I have been threatening to try film photography again.  To date I still haven’t! However I took some nighttime images at a candlelight vigil at Belfast City Hall commemorating the outbreak of The Great War when a friend of mine commenting on the image said you should try black and white.

So I have created an image using Silver Efex Pro using a Kodak Tri X Pro filter to emulate film photography.  Tri X Pro was a 400ASA black and white film which was regarded as a fast film, so I suspect this is what I would have been using for this event.

In the darkroom you would have used dodging and burning to bring up the areas of the photograph that you wanted to enhance, this is what I did using Silver Efex Pro when I lightened the face of the man in uniform.  To enable you to compare I have the original image and the monochrome copy.  I will let you decide whether or not it looks like an image produced from a negative!

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission 

Capturing that special event

The 100th anniversary of the outbreak of The Great War was remembered at Belfast City Hall on the evening of 4 August in line with the national commemorations held throughout the United Kingdom.  It was an occasion that I wanted to capture but the question was how?

It would be dark, so a fast prime lens seemed a good idea.  There would be large numbers of people present so I decided to travel light, using just one lens, a 35mm equivalent f1.4 that would be good for capturing the wide view yet also good for closer shots within the crowd.  Shooting between 10pm and 11pm a higher ISO setting was also a good choice, so I set it camera to auto ISO with a maximum of 3200iso.  I also decided not to use flash, which is useless for distance shots and blasts out closeup shots.

So much for preplanning, the aim was to capture the mood and significance of the evening, the following were the results.  The following images hopefully convey something of the mood.

A lucky shot, I caught someone else's flash!

A lucky shot, I caught someone else’s flash!

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All images taken with a Fujifilm X Pro 1, 23mm f1.4 lens, taken at 1/60 second, a couple at 1/30 second.  Apertures ranged from f1.4 to f2.5.

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission 

Belfast’s built heritage

This is Cromwell Road in the university district of Belfast.  Now a rather run down district inhabited mainly by students and now more recently by immigrants.  The architecture and style of this particular terrace demonstrates its grand past, a reflection of more prosperous times.  When I consulted a 1901 street directory I noted that the inhabitants were recorded as accountants, engineering chemist, agents and a RIC Sub Inspector.

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Many now converted into flats the interior of the houses will have been subdivided.  I hope that our city planners will have the good sense at least to preserve the facade of the terrace!

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A casual walk around the streets of south Belfast reveal a wealth of material to photograph.  I remember visiting one of these houses over thirty years when I was a social security visitor, good to see the terrace is still standing!

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission 

Low light qualities of the X Pro 1

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A quick visit to Howth Pier gave me an opportunity to try out my Fujifilm X Pro 1 at night time.  The image above was taken at Howth when I photographed these fishermen landing their catch.  It was taken at 22.40 using only the available light from the fishing trawler and the lighting on the quayside.

I used a surprisingly low ISO setting, just 640, with my 35mm lens wide open at f1.4.  The 35mm Fujinon lens is a remarkable piece of glass, all the Fuji prime lenses are very fast! Shooting at 1/60 second the camera was handheld.  You cannot really judge the quality from the above photograph which is just 700pixels wide, so below I have selected a 100% crop from the above image so as you can judge for yourself.

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Even at 100% resolution the image is quite smooth with minimal digital noise, I have not used the sharpening tool in preparing these images, even the exposure and contrast settings have been left untouched.

What is there not to like about the X Pro 1?  It is providing a serious challenge to my Nikon gear; anyone what to buy a camera?

 

On the move!

Back to my street photography theme!  In a recent blog I said that unlike landscape photography were the photographer takes meticulous care to arrange the elements in the frame and to wait for the right light, street photography is very different in that your composition is often imperfect due to the constantly changing scene.

Today I used a technique to try and simplify the streetscape scene.  I found a backdrop that I wanted to appear in the photograph and waited for something or someone interesting to enter the frame.  Using this approach there was at least one constant that I could depend on.

The background I selected was a large advertising poster in the shop window announcing that they had moved.  It featured a coloured lady and what I was looking for was someone to enter the frame that would provide a contrast.  It was interesting that people entering the frame were obviously three dimensional, whereas the woman in the poster was two dimensional.  However I was conscious that whenever a photograph is exposed the entire image is two dimensional.

I waited in the one position for around 20 minutes (my wife was shopping!) and took several exposures, the image below is probably the best, I have entitled it …on the move!

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All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission