Print it big!

This past week I have conducted a small experiment with photographs that have featured in my last couple of blogs.  The problem with digital photography is that few images taken ever get printed and Facebook is killing the photographic print.  So I decided to print some myself and to select two printing labs to print the same images for comparison, one local and the other from Stockport.

From the three options my own printer and the locally based printing lab produced similar results, so I was quite pleased that my own printer, a Canon Pro 9500 MkII, was up to the job.  However DS Colour Labs Ltd from Stockport provided an outstanding service at half the price of the locally based print lab and their print quality was simply outstanding.  I definitely recommend them.

Printing the image big is also recommended, in this case I printed 12 x 16 inch prints which rendered fine detail, the following image of the prints does not really do them justice.

bradley-L1007511-1007752

I personally use Fujifilm Satin inkjet printing paper which gives fine results.  I also noted that DS Colour Labs Ltd also used Fujifilm paper.  The prints were printed on Fujifilm Pearl Crystal Archive paper which gave my monochrome prints an almost silver metallic appearance. When selecting images to print those which show good contrast and a good dynamic range look great. I would be happy to settle on this paper but would like to see how colour prints are rendered.

Finally, rather than viewing your photographs on a PC screen try printing them!

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.  

 

The black & white print!

I am still in my monochrome phase!  By selecting carefully the right composition it can often be better to render the image in monochrome.  Some people print in monochrome simply because the colour version was weak; this is a terrible reason to choose monochrome!  So what am I trying to achieve?  The following image is Kilmood Parish Church, a five minute drive from where I live:

bradley-L1007625-

What I am looking for in a monochrome image is a good dynamic range from pure black to pure white.  I want lots of detail that will almost produce a 3D image, of course a photograph can only be two dimensional but you can get a 3D look!  In this image I was focusing on the headstone in the foreground, yet with a f4 aperture I was able to achieve good depth of field to the church tower in the background.  The right light does help, weak winter sunlight – a great time to take photographs!

Of course holding a 12 x 16 inch print in your hand is the real test, the computer screen does not do it justice and even less a Facebook posting ;-)

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission. 

 

Photographic lines

This blog is more about composition, something I don’t talk enough about!  But in framing a photograph the lines of direction, or to put it another way, the direction of force within the image are important, among other things.  It is the leading lines that direct how you read the image, they direct your eyes into the image.  There are of course other visual influences such as colour and lightness and darkness.

bradley-L1007511-

In the above image I used the line of the roof on the left to draw your eye towards the centre of the image and in this case it works.

bradley-L1007505-

The use of lines in this image is quite different, perhaps more subtle.  I have used the line of the roof of a burial vault in the foreground with that of the line of the church gable end roof to frame the shadow of a branch from trees that were behind me.  The church tower at the other end of the building provide a depth of the image, which incidentally was taken at f2.8, not an aperture associated with deep depth of field.  This is where a wide angle lens comes into its own, in this case a 35mm lens.

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.

From this to this!

One of the joys for a photographer is to see how their images are used by others.  How will they interpret your images or will they change the message you intended when you made the photograph?  One of the pleasures of working with graphic designers is getting a brief of what they want and then going out to achieve the specific requirement, armed with the knowledge of what they are tasked to achieve.  The following image and location was the subject of a recent blog came about following a brief chat with a designer and now it has been used to promote walking tours featuring CS Lewis:

bradley-6110

This image was interpreted in the following way.  Note how the feel of the image is now projecting a much more dramatic and even sinister mood!  The skills of the photographer and the graphic designer coming together.

bradley-screenshot-04

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.

 

 

Robbie Burns in Belfast

Recently I was asked to take a photograph of a half scale statue of Robbie Burns which is currently on loan to the Linenhall Library.  As you will see from the photograph below cabinet lighting on an adjacent display cabinet made it rather difficult to capture, but the library staff were very helpful in finding ways to exclude the unwanted light.  The image here is was taken before blacking out the glass panel behind the statue.

bradley-5742

After doing a little on-line research I found some information about the origins of this statue as follows:

There’s nothing too good for the Irish ” not even a statue of Robert Burns ” and it is not to be wondered at that the only public memorial to the great poet in the Emerald Isle is to be found in the capital of Protestant Ulster, Belfast.

In September, 1893, a number of the leading Scotsmen in Belfast, ably led by Mr. James Dewar, determined to inaugurate a “Poets’ Corner” in the Art Gallery of the Public Library, by presenting to the Corporation of the city a half -life size statue of the Immortal Bard. The statue is a beautiful and inspiring representation of the poet, and is a replica of the grand statue of Burns which adorns his native town of Ayr, by George A. Lawson, Hon. R. S. A. The pedestal of Peterheadgranite on which the statue rests, bears the following inscription: “ROBERT BURNS 1750″1796.  

(Source: http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/The_Worlds_Memorials_of_Robert_Burns_1000271836/147)

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.

 

CS Lewis sculpture

bradley-5640A new year brings new opportunities and challenges and the possibilities in photography are endless.  I was recently asked if I had an image of the CS Lewis sculpture located in East Belfast, the well known author and Christian apologist and of course an Ulsterman!  I replied that I hadn’t but that I always intended to photograph it but have never got around to so.  I made my first visit on Christmas Eve, I returned on Christmas Day and then yet again on Boxing Day. 

You would be forgiven for asking why so many visits?  Each time I returned the light was different which changed the image.  I kept finding new angles to shoot from and using different lenses also changed the image I saw through the viewfinder.  This is the standard approach taken by any editorial photographer, cover all angles and points of view and you will get the image that the client wants.
 
Clive Staples Lewis
Novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, and Christian apologist.
Born: November 29, 1898, Belfast
Died: November 22, 1963, Oxford
Spouse: Joy Davidman (m. 1956–1960)
Plays: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Movies and TV shows: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Books: Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Voyage of the Dawn…
 
All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.

Christmas Party Time

bradley-5465To end the year a photograph from a senior’s Christmas party which just proves that even older people can enjoy a visit from Santa!

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.  

Drawing to year’s end

This is the seventieth blog so far this year, now time to slow down and review!  I tend to only publish recently taken photographs, although on the odd occasion I have dipped into the archives, which is useful for judging whether or not your photography has improved.

I have found that I have almost switched from Nikon to the Fuji X Series gear for my casual and fun photography; I now tend to only use Nikon for specific purposes.  Is the SDLR dead?  Well not quite but who knows what the future will hold.

We are now in a Christmas phase, the first two images were taken at Saintfield Christmas Fair at night time.  I love taking images in the dark using available street light.  and the third image is of the interior of All Saints’ Parish Church, Belfast.

Bradley-5304 Bradley-5305

Bradley-5318

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission.  

Christmas markets again!

Over the past few days I have visited two Christmas markets, Belfast and Manchester.  Its been a while since I talked about what attracts me to make certain images and my recent visit to two city centre Christmas markets provide a perfect opportunity to do just this. Here are the two images I selected and my reasons for their selection.

Belfast Christmas Market

Belfast Christmas Market

Manchester Christmas Market

Manchester Christmas Market

I took just a few images at each location rather than shooting in all directions.  Both cities were hiving with people and in these situations I find it difficult to simplify what I see through the viewfinder.   In the case of the Belfast market it was the colour which drew my attention.  Red is a strong colour and the scene was naturally framed by the stall itself.

In the second image the couple in the lefthand side foreground drew my attention.  They were isolated in their own space and I was struck by how I could counter balance their vertical stance with the advertising cylinder on the opposite side of the frame.

The other feature common to both images is that ‘the decisive moment’ was captured, in the first image the exchange of money to complete a transaction and in the second the boy letting the girl take a bite from his beef burger.

Henri Cartier-Bresson was a French photographer considered to be the father of photojournalism and the master of candid photography.  He coined the phrase ‘the decisive moment’ which he described as follows. “There is a creative fraction of a second when you are taking a picture. Your eye must see a composition or an expression that life itself offers you, and you must know with intuition when to click the camera. That is the moment the photographer is creative”.

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission

Armistice Day 2014 – Belfast City Hall

Several hundred city centre workers paused for a few minutes to remember the armistice at Belfast City Hall in heavy rain.  This more informal and impromptu event is in contrast to the formal and elaborate proceedings held on Remembrance Sunday.

Bradley-6083

A wider angle view show the crowd waiting in silence.

The quotation on the cenotaph reads:

“Throughout the long years of struggle which have now so gloriously ended, the men of Ulster have proved how nobly they fight and die.”  George V

Bradley-5106

All images contained on this website remain the property of Roger Bradley. Images may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, projected, or used in any way without express written permission